Tag Archives: Tim Parkin

A wee taster: large format photography

Large Format Landscape Photography WorkshopsA long time ago I booked for a May one-day workshop exploring large-format photography; I had to postpone this because of my broken arm, and went this weekend instead. I hope to show one of two of the images at a later date if they’re any good, but spending a take exploring what large format cameras are capable of, and the possibilities they offer, was great.

Theoretically knowing what such things can do is quite different to experiencing it, to trying it.  As someone suggested to me, it’s a bit like knowing  about cars in theory, but actually doing the driving is quite different.  This was just an introduction, but the two workshop leaders, Dav Thomas and Tim Parkin, worked well together to explain what we were aiming for and how to achieve particular things.  After showing us some of the mechanics of the cameras and why certain things worked they did, we had a go at focusing on trees in the middle-distance and heather and grasses in the foreground – if you’ve never used an LF camera before, this isn’t as straightforward as it sounds, though very satisfying when it finally works!

After lunch, we went up the hill and took some photographs.  For a newbie, it takes a long time to frame and focus each image, so, including a walk to the top of a hill (and a quick march back down at the end of the day in the pouring rain!), I took three photographs in just under 4 hours.  I think setting up, framing and focusing took between about 20 and 45 minutes – perhaps I’m just slow, but I think the other three people on the workshop were taking just as long.  Of course, it does get faster with practice – I started with a complicated composition in the woods that didn’t really work as well as it might have done had the sun shone consistently.  I then moved to another spot, and took time to get that set up correctly… a good 45 minutes, I think!  My third and final image was simpler in composition and took about 20 minutes, and I was able to release the shutter just as the first drops of rain came down.

So why go for large format?  Aside from the phenomenal detail and corresponding image size involved, for me the attraction would be in what it becomes possible to do when you can tilt and shift the lens and the back of the camera independently of one another.  Last night, after coming back from the Peak District, I found myself dreaming of retaking this image:

Goslpie harbour, final image

Goslpie harbour, final image

When I was in the harbour I wanted the lines of the jetty to be straight and for the coils of rope in the foreground to be visible, as they were when I looked at it without the camera, but it was an impossible effect to achieve with an SLR (these were taken on a DSLR).  Here is the ‘straight out of the camera’ image:

Golspie harbour, from camera

Golspie harbour, from camera

Straightening the lines of the jetty has introduced distortion – still acceptable, I think – into some of the other elements of the image, such as the white boat on the left and the blue boat in the foreground.  It’s also removed part of the coils.  I knew that I wanted what became the final image, and knew that if I took it as it was I could ‘fix’ the perspective in Photoshop.  But with a LF camera, such post-processing changes could have been largely unnecessary, or at least much reduced.  A tilt-shift lens could probably have helped me here as well, but in terms of cost, it seems to me to make more sense just to go with a LF set-up instead of a tilt-shift lens – and then one can benefit from the quality and flexibility of LF too.

So is a LF camera going to be added to my collection of tools in the future?  The one concern I have is that I struggled with the dark-cloth – I know that I am a little claustrophobic and it required considerable will-power to spend long periods setting up each shot under the dark cloth.  A black fleece jacket, which is much more open than the professional cloths Dav and Tim offered, might be a better solution for me.  I think my next step will be to borrow an LF camera sometime and play a little more with it, but I see no reason NOT to invest, once my finances allow!

In the meantime, if you’re wondering whether this might be something for you, or you just want to try something a bit different, do go on one of Dav and Tim’s courses – it was enjoyable, informative, and the two of them are a good team.

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Dornoch images

Embo - beach

Embo - beach

Tim Parkin from Great British Landscapes has been in touch and interviewed me for the magazine; this will be appearing shortly.  In talking with him I realised that I had completely forgotten to upload images from the week in Dornoch last summer, when I spent much of the time photographing using just my prime lenses (in Nikon DX format, the 35mm f1.8 and 50mm f1.4).  A fault with my film camera meant I couldn’t take that with me, so all the images that week were created digitally, on the Nikon D90.

As I note in the text on the gallery page, this marked an interesting point in my compositions.  Click on the image here to see the gallery, or look down the list to the side.

Alternative aspect ratios

Bruce Percy, one of my favourite photographers, posted another interesting entry on his blog a few days ago.  As you may know if you’ve read other entries on my blog, he is not only a gifted photographer, but also offers brilliant photography workshops.  This particular blog posting was (provocatively) called “Abolish 3:2 (35mm)” and discussed aspect ratios: the size/shape of the viewfinders and resultant images in cameras. From the early days of 35mm film cameras to today’s DSLR cameras (as well as most compacts etc.), the format has stayed the same: all images are a multiple of 3 x 2. This makes for relatively long images, horizontally or vertically, but it’s not a very “natural” format, particularly for landscape imagery. After all, we don’t see the world in this way: our (peripheral) vision is much broader than this, and we see more in all directions. I have to say that I think the 3:2 format can work well for portraits because it can be used for the length of the human body. But for landscapes, a “squarer” format often tends to work better, either a real square (i.e. with sides of exactly the same length) or nearly square (such as 4×5 or 6×7 or similar). One of things Bruce tries to encourage is visualisation: “seeing” the image as you want it to be, even before you squeeze the shutter. He’s written quite a bit about this in his ebooks too (especially in “The Visual Sense“).  His blog posting was picked up by others (for example, The Photographer’s Ephemeris and then Tim Parkin, and a lively discussion took place about all this (on Twitter).

However, it is not always easy to visualise in a different aspect ratio to the one the camera offers.  Tim Parkin pointed to a product that did this for his DSLR (though Tim is mostly a large format, not a DSLR photographer). That seemed like a good idea, but even if it were available for my camera, it seemed like an unnecessary expense to a poor person like me, so here is my version of the same thing for my Nikon D90, manufactured at great expense (er… yes… that is a wonky piece of card I’ve cut to size and jammed in behind the plastic cover of my screen…):

4x5 template for D90

4x5 template for D90

It does present problems when I want to see all the settings, as some of the key menu options are hidden under the bottom piece of card:

4x5 template for D90

4x5 template for D90

Nonetheless, once I remembered to use the “liveview” function on the camera rather than composing through the viewfinder, it did change how I went about composing: rather than guessing at what a 4×5 ratio image would look like, I could really see it on the screen. It is stating the obvious to note that it does make quite a difference to see the image in the proportions I am ultimately aiming for – even if I intend to crop the image later.

4x5 template for D90

4x5 template for D90

Of course, what I want next is a quick and easy way to convert this template to a square format.

And for my film camera… er… I can see the argument for a new investment coming…