Kronsgaard, Schleswig-Holstein

Note: this was originally a blog posting on another site. When I closed that account, I decided this collection should have a gallery all to itself. To my surprise, this collection of images has become something of a phenomenon, even appearing briefly on German TV. The original comments on the blog post are in a replacement blog posting on this site; the text below and the images are copied directly from the old site to here.


6.8.2011

I’m just back from a few weeks in Germany, visiting friends and family. One of the delights of driving in Germany is the good roads: when warning signs announce damaged roads, it usually means very minor damage that would go unnoticed in Britain (where the roads tend to be collections of potholes linked with tarmac and gravel – I exaggerate only slightly!). So when a road really is damaged, it is noteworthy…

One such road I encountered this time was the K111 at Kronsgaard, leading to the beautiful beach at Pottloch. A small local road (Kreisstrasse), it is – even by British standards! – in a shocking condition, and has been for some time. The local authority continually postpones repairing the road for financial reasons. The residents of the village are so fed up with this situation that they have created their own signs about the perils of driving through their village.

The first sign is the official one, announcing damage to the road, but the low speed limit (20km/h – that’s about 12m/h!) should be a warning of what is to come:

Welcome to Kronsgaard!

Welcome to Kronsgaard!

Turn the first corner, and the next sign warns you to drive ‘very carefully!’ This is the ‘sorrow street to the beach!’

Kronsgaard - die Jammerstraat

Kronsgaard - die Jammerstraat

Many of the signs – this one asks ‘where has our road gone?’ – are painted onto old doors:

Kronsgaard - the lost road

Kronsgaard - the lost road

Not a sign about the road, but this wee sign about holiday apartments being available to rent, right next to a discarded hub cap from a Mercedes car, is ominous:

Kronsgaard - not even a Mercedes can survive

Kronsgaard - not even a Mercedes can survive

In case you hadn’t worked it out yet, this road is actually a ‘shock absorber test route’… I’m not sure how Mercedes did on this, given the spare hub cap!

Kronsgaard - test route

Kronsgaard - test route

In any case, ‘slalom driving is forbidden’, tempting though it might be:

Kronsgaard - driving slalom?

Kronsgaard - driving slalom?

This sign warns drivers to ‘Take care! Children in the potholes!’…

Kronsgaard - children in the street

Kronsgaard - children in the street

… but since swimming in the puddles is forbidden, one has to wonder what the children of the village might be doing in the potholes.

Kronsgaard - swimming opportunities?

Kronsgaard - swimming opportunities?

Perhaps they are lying in wait for passing cars, after all, ‘The K111 is death for people and machines’ – that’s the Reaper hiding behind that sign!

Kronsgaard - DEATH!

Kronsgaard - DEATH!

‘Our nightmare – murder road K111’ at this junction is communicating a clear message…

Kronsgaard's nightmare

Kronsgaard's nightmare

This situation has been going on for a long time – I understand the signs have been up for at least a year now – as this ‘never-ending story’ sign at the junction indicates:

Kronsgaard - the never-ending story

Kronsgaard - the never-ending story

On a more frivolous note, the playing theme recurred at the junction too: here the K111 is described as a ‘play road’ – golf being the obvious suggestion, with all those holes.

Kronsgaard - a golfer's paradise

Kronsgaard - a golfer's paradise

Of course, 20km/h is not particularly fast, leading this snail to mutter ‘Scheiss Strasse’…

Kronsgaard snails complain

Kronsgaard snails complain

Sanity is obviously being questioned by this wit, who asks if the K11 is a ‘road or a condition’:

Kronsgaard - the road is madness!

Kronsgaard - the road is madness!

Things are so bad that even any track across a field would be better!

Kronsgaard - fields preferable?

Kronsgaard - fields preferable?

At the other end of the village, another welcome sign drew visitors’ attention to ‘the beautiful K111’. Amusingly, a local car came along and parked as I was taking this photograph – you’ll notice that the driver has been very careful to stop on the good bit of road, just before the shock absorber test route begins!

Kronsgaard - haste ye back!

Kronsgaard - haste ye back!

I would love to see the K111 be repaired, but in the meantime, these signs are a superb initiative by the villagers, and apart from making their dissatisfaction apparent, they also distract a bit from the shocking state of the road! 🙂

[NB This posting was imported from a blog I once used. The comments from that blog have been imported to this entry in my blog; comments here are from March 2012 onwards, when this page was created.]

 

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